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. >> they are a critical player at this point, the five-star movement of beppe grillo. could he changes into- establishment position at some point? >> since the election last month, he has insulted bersani practically every day, and he continues to do that today. >> it requires on the road to damascus for him to change his mind. >> where does italy go from here? could we see new elections? >> nobody wants to see new elections. i think what will happen now is president of peloton a will do something similar to what we did in november 2011 when he appointed the current prime minister, mario monti, the former european commissioner. he may try to do something like that. he may look to people like the former premier, the current interior minister, or the former european commissioner to try to take -- put together a short- term government whose major responsibility will be to guard confidence for the international markets and in the meantime, the only item on the agenda will be to change the current electoral legislation. >> thank you so much for that update. the restrictions in cyprus on account access could re
changes into- establishment position at some point? >> since the election last month, he has insulted bersani practically every day, and he continues to do that today. >> it requires on the road to damascus for him to change his mind. >> where does italy go from here? could we see new elections? >> nobody wants to see new elections. i think what will happen now is president of peloton a will do something similar to what we did in november 2011 when he appointed the current prime minister, mario monti, the former european commissioner. he may try to do something like that. he may look to people like the former premier, the current interior minister, or the former european commissioner to try to take -- put together a short- term government whose major responsibility will be to guard confidence for the international markets and in the meantime, the only item on the agenda will be to change the current electoral legislation. >> thank you so much for that update. the restrictions in cyprus on account access could remain in place for a month -- that is the word today as thousands of people
of changes to domestic tax rates that we have been alluded to that are attractive for those russian companies in cyprus. in terms of the broader solution, whether it is just the changing of the terms of that 2.5 billion euro loan, an extension, another 5 billion which is sensibly would cover most of the money which would have been raised by the deposit tax. i'll put this forward. the more risk there is now associated with companies, countries, individuals holding money in cyprus, surely those companies and countries and individuals will not want to keep their money in cyprus and you're going to risk capital flight the minute those controls come off whether they are russian investors are global investors and more money that leaves the system, the larger the bailout has to be and there is the problem unluck unlocked eu proposal. >> thank you very much. appreciate your time. here's a look at what's happening in markets as we digest news flow. it's green behind me. this goes back to the point people are making when it comes to the crisis. despite the extraordinary nature, we're still looking at a
. >> it's impossible to know with any certainty the changes that would be worked on society by redefining the institution of marriage. >> suppose a state said, because we think that the focus of marriage really should be on procreation, we are not going to give marriage licenses any more to any couple where both people are over the age of 55. would that be constitutional? >> reporter: the court's conservatives were equally skeptical that gay couples have a right to marry. >> i'm curious, when did it become unconstitutional to exclude homosexual couples from marriage? 1791? 1868, when the 14th amendment was adopted? >> reporter: they said though gay couples in california have all the rights of married couples, letting them be called married would be a big change. >> if you tell a child that someone has to be their friend, i suppose you can force the person to say, this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that's what it seems to me the supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. >> you want us to step in and render a decision based on the assess
for those reports, at least for the time being. germany's governing coalition wants to change that. i of their draft laws passed, search engines would have to pay fees to publishers for using their reports. >> we want journalists and publishers to get paid enough for their work. the internet is really efficient, but the content that people search and save does not just right itself. >> the opposition says the draft law is too vague about what search engines would have to pay for. the draft law says search engines would not have to pay to show snippets of articles, but they would if they publish full articles. however, it does not say what a snippet is. the greens said opposition is also strong outside parliament. >> german journalists and the freelance journalist association are against your bill, and so are well-known constitutional law professors and basically every copyright expert in the country. >> many net experts in the government are also skeptical about the bill, but the government has the numbers in the bundestag, so the bill passed. it is however expected to meet resistance
trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit exelonpatchoffer.com. ♪ ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> welcome back everyone. here are the stories making news around the world right now. >> in the central africa republic, the president was forced to flee his own country. rebels seized the capital. the president is
. the united states will not engage in talks for talks' sake. it will require a change in north korea's parties, demanding that pyongyang will meet its obligations on denuclearization. this leads to a few important other principals. first, the nightsticks will not accept north korea as a nuclear quest the united states will not accept the tree as a nuclear state. we will not compensate them for returning to dialogue. we will not tolerate north korea for bullying its majors -- measures. -- neighbors treat the tysons cannot approve without improvement in injured-korean relations. in the meantime, at the u.s. diplomacy on north korea on a wide range of issues continues. close coordination with our treaty allies, japan, remain absolutely central to our approach. we have expanded our engagement might develop a new dialogue key global actors who have joined the rising chorus of voices, calling on the dprk to comply with obligations. china does remain central to altering or korea's calculus and close u.s.-china confrontations will remain a key focus of the medics -- of diplomatic efforts. while the cl
, and this is our opportunity to do it. mr. chairman, you have worked with me on your bill making many changes at my request. they have made the bill better and reduced the negative side effects of previous versions. i trust you think so as well because you have included the changes in the new bill. the new bill in your substitute amendment also included a revised bill by senators gillibrand and kirk on the subject of gun trafficking. those revisions also reflect changes that i asked senator gillibrand to make, and i think it would be worthwhile to outline all the changes that have been made to the bill since they were first introduced. i think they demonstrate good faith of the chairman and senator gillibrand. for instance, senator gillibrand's bill originally would have made it a federal crime to transfer two or more guns if that person knew that the result would be a violation of state or local law. that would have given states and localities a one-way incentive to address new gun control measures and force the cost of prosecution and incarceration on the federal government. it also would have cr
counter the country's past stance but the prime minister says things are changing. >> translator: joining the new production system will help secure the stable purchase of this jet. >> reporter: his chief cabinet secretary said the change will benefit japan in many ways. >> translator: the participation in the production of the f-35 will nurture, maintain and enhance the technological expertise in defense equipment production. therefore, it will greatly contribute to japan's defense. >> reporter: japanese lawmakers brought in something called the three principles on arms experts in the 1960s. they essentially banned weapons exports to communist bloc nations, countries subjected to arms export embargoes under u.n. security council resolutions, and countries involved in or likely to be involved in international conflicts. exporting arms parts or technology to make arms was also in principle prohibited. some exceptions were made over the years for the united states. in 2011, prime minister yoshihiko noda effectively relaxed the three principles and allowed the joint development and transfer
garb, not in papal white but in simple priestley black. he changed later on. but in any case it was another sign of what we've been talking about all along, his humility. i took a closer look at the new pope in a story last night. >> translator: begin this journ journey. >> reporter: his journey began wednesday when cardinal jorge mario bergoglio of argentina was elected to lead the catholic church. he's the first non-european pope since the 8th century and first pope ever from south america. he will called pope francis, in honor of st. francis of assisi. bergoglio was born in 1936 in buenos aires, argentina. the son of an italian i'll grant, a railway worker. he had four brothers and sisters. he studied to brk a chemist before receiving the call to the priesthood. the 76-year-old was ordained a jesuit in december of 1969. and has served as orsh bishop of buenos aires. he was made a cardinal on february 21st, 2001. bergoglio is said to have been the runner-up in a 2005 concl e conclave. and in 2013 he was the oldest of the possible candidate, barely mentioned ad eed as a top
brother john died of aids. marie howe, who said, "john's living and dying changed my aesthetic entirely." >> the gate. i had no idea that the gate i would step through to finally enter this world would be the space my brother's body made. he was a little taller than me: a young man but grown, himself by then, done at twenty-eight, having folded every sheet, rinsed every glass he would ever rinse under the cold and running water. this is what you have been waiting for, he used to say to me. and i'd say, what? and he'd say, this -- holding up my cheese and mustard sandwich. and i would say, what? and he would say, this, sort of looking around. ♪ >>> this week on "moyers & company" -- >> they confuse bank profitable with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same things. there's a right way and a wrong way. >>> and your questions for richard wolf. >> professor wolf. >> professor wolf. >> we'll answer the question. >>> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of the fiphilanthropy. the coleberg foundation with support from the partridge foundatio
. the substitute also incorporates a number of changes, the result of suggestions from senator grassley and his staff. we have been working on this since january. tried to be responsive to the ranking member's concerns and suggestions, and have reached across the aisle to other senators. as an a.t.f. whistleblower, senator grassley has been the lead senator in whistleblower legislation, was an a.t.f. whistleblower, who testified last congress that the existing laws are toothless and they can't help law enforcement, and that's why law enforcement consistently has called for firearms trafficking statute that can be effective and go after straw purchasers. we need now is to create better law enforcement tools. and i think this will -- the senators can join together on this will close a very dangerous loophole in the law that mexican drug cartels and gangs and other criminals have exploited for too long. stop illegal trafficking. the firearms act is important. this week the "usa today" ran a front page story about a study that estimates gun violence costs americans $12 billion, $12 billion a year.
, this is my friend. but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that's it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> it is like you were to say you can vote, you can travel but you may not be a citizen. there are certain labels in this country that are very, very critical. >> pretty interesting analogy there. let us know what you think about it. saying someone is friend, does that change the definition of sfrend? jeffrey toobin, he was in the courtroom today. jeff, what's your sense of how the court is going to rule? this is obviously if they go ahead and do something big here, this is huge. this is transformational for much of the country. >> it is but, you know, this was an unusually baffling argument. i have to say. usually, you have some sense, sometimes you can have a wrong sense and i've certainly had wrong senses before, but the court so fractured over so many issues that, frankly, it wouldn't surprise me to see almost any result at this point. it
enforcement more effective tools. the substitute also incorporates a number of changes, the result of suggestions from senator grassley and his staff. we have been working on this since january. tried to be responsive to the ranking member's concerns and suggestions, and have reached across the aisle to other senators. as a a.t.f. whistleblower, senator grassley has been the lead senator in whistleblower legislation, was a a.t.f. whistleblower, who testified last congress that the existing laws are toothless and they can help law enforcement -- can't help law enforcement, and that's why law enforcement consistently has called for firearms trafficking statute that can be effective and go after straw purchasers. we need now is to create better law enforcement tools. and i think this will -- the senators can join together on this will close a very dangerous loophole in the law that mexican drug cartels and gangs and other criminals have exploited for too long. stop illegal trafficking the firme arms act is important. this week -- the firearms act is important. this week the "usa today
need a culture change with the regulators. i talk about this a lot in my book. you've got a lot of good-will intentioned people, but they confuse bank profitability with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same thing. there's the right way and there's a wrong way to make money. they're almost aligning themselves to bank managers and wanting to have the appearance of profitability because they think that makes a sound banking system. it's really upside down. you can't ignore the problems here. some of that is overlooked. >> we thought we were going to get a culture change after the big crash. >> yeah, well, i think it's coming slowly but not fast enough. it's amazing that, you know, so many years after the crisis less than half of the dodd frank rules have been completed. a lot of them are watered down. >> by? >> well, the regulators have come to do this. some of the provisions in dodd frank had too many provisions, but we get more exceptions when these proposals come out such as the volcker rule. we get these rules that are hard to enforce and easy to game. >> when dodd frank and
senators across the senate are women. just recognize that, again, this has been really a significant change, and our motivation, of course, is to reach the best and brightest, retain the best human capital we can find across the enterprise. can i have the next slide, please. same-sex benefits. this is an issue that, frankly, interesting time. i look at -- i look at how it's playing out in washington, and i think this is kind of showing me what's going to happen here ahead. you know, we had the repeal of don't ask, don't tell back in the fall of 2011, and it was pretty much a nonevent. people said, oh, it's going to be a change, it's going to be significant, just an upheaval of massive social proportions. it's been known of that. we knew that. we knew that going in, that, look, the generation you represent, this is nothing. you all understood this for a long time, but it's not about who you are with, but about the quality of the person you are. we see that play out. it's been an interesting change to see the follow-up from that. not withstanding the don't ask, don't tell policy and opening o
of hospital errors. ten years ago, we learned about the exhausted medical intern. so the policies changed. fewer hours, more changes of shift. but tonight, a counterintuitive surprise. did this put patients at greater risk? abc's chief medical and melt adviser richard besser on a vulnerable moment in a hospital room. watch out for the handoff. >> reporter: there are as many 98,000 deaths each year from mistakes made in america's hospitals. some of the blame -- exhausted doctors. but the new studies are raising questions about the fix. interns today report making more mistakes than they did when the shifts were longer and they had less sleep. one of the major reasons, shorter shifts mean doctors hand off critical information about you and your care to the next team on duty more frequently. whenever you or a loved one is in the hospital you need to be aware of this. think of it as a game of telephone. it used to be, during a three-day stay in the hospital, your information was handed off three different times. now as many as nine. the more handoffs, the greater the chance for mistakes. thes
positive -- it makes people aware, it makes people take initiative to change things, for example? last year there was a video that went viral on youtube about the guy that was taking charge in uganda. and i had never heard about that. all of my friends were talking about it and nobody knew about this. and now all of these celebrities are starting charities and i know that there is controversy on where that money was going. but my point is there a way to make the shooters aware of what is going on? >> one of the positive things is all the people wanting to donate. a lot of good can come out of publicity. but you just have to take the killer out of the picture. that's the problem. so i think giving a good example, i did a study with my colleague of people magazine. we looked at every cover from the 70s up to a few years ago. when they first started, it was all about people who did good things. they had people and politicians who did the right thing. medical discoveries, astronauts who did great things, here it is. and over time it started to get very negative. after a while, the majority of t
book that wants to make the argument that actually change people's lives and actually changed the culture. it came under criticism more recently for not only reflecting the lives of small business people, for not talking about a working-class women that have no choice but to work all along and not talking about people love of their sexual preferences who may have already found themself out of the conventional life. but what i want to do a little bit today is talk about the ongoing power of this classic. i recently talked this book at nyu a couple of whom are here in this audience who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring and they're important attention. it is amazing to me that the class comes to life and the book spoke to them and interesting ways. i want to talk about the war the feminine mystique and whether it still presses and it's complicated because we live in a world that has been so transformed in this book and in the movement that followed most of us in the room who were born after "the feminine mystique" came out. it's hard to imagine those days at
of the united nations. but even there today, a brief moment of silent tribute. this is a moment of change, undoubtedly. also, this is not about politics. it is about a man and a deep, a visceral sense of loss. >> hugo chavez's koffman has just arrived at the military academy -- coffin has just arrived at the military academy, where he will lie in state until friday. i spoke with the former venezuelan minister of trade who joins us from new york. well hugo chavez's brand of populism outlive him? >> it will. there are several forces that he unleashed in the country that are going to be there for awhile. at the front of the debate, the poor and needy. he was very vehement about their exclusion he also did that in a highly polarized in fashion. the politics of rage and revenge have become part of the political fabric of the country and that is one of the many wounds that need to be late -- shield, whoever -- that needs to be healed, whoever his successor is. >> you think that will come with the election, whenever that is? >> this is not an end -- a normal election when there is a political pa
's womb. the same exposure to prenatal testosterone and estrogen changes how the limb brick -- limbec brain is organized. >> huh,. >> it's a marker for subtle brain differences seated with the joinedder and transscend gender. >> chapter 5, was eating that full of ice cream there. you got into the men and women thing. >> yeah. >> and a lot of people would think competitive woman, you know, she's too edgy or too rough, she's not nice and could be evil. yet, these are the women who get ahead. where am i wrong in that? >> i don't know about the characteristic temp ram. >> and that is what people think. >> and one of the things they thought was certainly what is a major social issue. how many women are represented in politics and especially at the national level. >> 18-point something%, 18.8. >> this great victories, right, of the women running in november and it's still only 18%. >> uh. >> the scientists for years said, well, women must be less competitive and turns out to be totally wrong. it's that women are good at judging the odds of whether they have a chance to win. >> uh. >> the me
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
to get the ban and will deliver a petition with 55,000 signatures to state regulators considering changes to state home furnishing guidelines which allow the chemicals' use. >> i am feeling like i should buy a lottery ticket. lisa said the chances for rain are not that great and -- boom! -- so what does that say? >> we are talking about isolated showers here around santa cruz, notice we have a little activity offshore and the hills of the east bay and low clouds will accompany this with a little bit of mist and drizzle as you head out. it will be cool and with that, the temperatures are being held fairly much in the 40's to near 50. hayward is near 50. los gatos is at 45 and 40 in santa rosa. always head out the door look for the cloud cover and cool conditions, 40's and 50's and by the afternoon the sea breeze kicks up mostly to partly cloudy skies, mid-60's an the bay with upper 60's inland east bay staying cool in the 50's at the coast and a look ahead, featuring the partly cloudy skies today, better chance of rain tomorrow, with similar temperatures. by friday, behind the system, a qu
change its mind? >> in this country, once there's a not guilty verdict, the case is over. but in italy, prosecutors can appeal. and they did appeal. and they won. and the high court effectively said try this case again. >> reporter: butt simply, the italian judicial system is very different than our own. even if she is convicted again, that can be appealed as well. >> she's worried. she doesn't understand. the system here is different from america, and i know there's a lot of concern in america about what happened here. i think it's a fair system. we have to analyze why the court has decided. and after that, perhaps we will be in a position to say something more. >> reporter: knox came to perussia to study italian in 2007. >> reporter: knox and her former boyfriend were found guilty. >> found guilty of sexually assaulting and killing ms. kercher. >> it was just weeks after her arrival that meredith kercher was brutally killed. knox and her then boyfriend of just one week were arrested. overnight she became a murder suspect and international immediate obsession. in december 2009, they w
you been able to change anybody's mind who perhaps was opposed to the bailout and upon seeing the results felt that in retrospect it was a good idea? >> guest: you know we became known as government -- to a lot of people and no question it hurt gm and continues to hurt it today. we did pay back the loan to the government and we paid back a lot of the equity investment the government made and yes i think people want gm to succeed. the government motors label is still there to some extent and it still affects some people but i think it's less now. i think once the indebtedness is totally paid i think it will go away. >> host: in the book you talk a lot about what you found when you are right that general motors. a lot of it was not necessarily apparent to the public. but what you found he found when he started looking underneath the hood. it was revealed very much for the first time in the book. share with us a little bit about to you as a seasoned executive when he arrived in detroit. >> guest: i expected certain things and i saw some of them and others i didn't. the morale was
running the company, had some outside people and some very fine people at the time. all that changed -- for the first part of the book, but the show, what we meant to the country overall, there's a couple of vignettes i will talk about briefly. there was a book written on something called -- a book about a russian sub that went down in the northwest pacific. the russians didn't know where the hell he was. they looked and looked, couldn't find. u.s. knew exactly where it was. and wanted to recover it because it was a nuclear sub. the codebooks were important, and the technology was important. they decided they would try and recover the so. there was a meeting in my apartment in new york with the general counsel of the cia, his deputy, and a deputy of howard hughes. of course, if they're going to do that they had to build a vessel, a very large vessel with a hole in the center that would stoop this sub out. and yet a think about what if the russians decide what we're doing was looking for that sub and knew what it was. what would happen if they fired on us? where would you bring this s
changing? >> i think it's a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we'll have to see because they're sitting on top of the oil reserve. you know where the the price of oil is. there, as you pow, there are a lot of problems. we have to see whether, you know, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms that needs to take, and we'll see and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far, i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any positive of the one in london. i give credit to gordon brown that was his greatest moment, i think, at that particular time to do it. you had well-organized meetings. i was in korean there was nobody organizing like the koreans. it was a great organized meetings. wars and, you know, nothing much came out of it. then the one in france it rained the whole time and it was rain on the parade because it was a disaster and nothing happened. there was a lot of nice intentions comes out of mexico in the last g20 it's not clear what we'll see. one of the areas we didn't get in to here is the whole question of r
a fundamental transformation, a systemic change, something we in central and eastern europe had to do 20 years ago, something similar. the other part of the problem is the european integration model, the excessive and unnatural centralization, harmonization, standardization, and unification of the european continent based on the concept of an ever-closer union is another obstacle. a few days ago i listened to the speech given by the italian minister of the economy, and he made a point that to build such an integration was a necessity. i raised my hand, and asked, what you mean, such an integration of the current form of european integration is an historical accident. it could have many developments, many of variants, and i am sure this one is the wrong one. these complex issues deserve to be discussed from many perspectives, but it is evident they found their climax in the attempt to monetary unify the whole continent. this was the moment, to use the ogy, when the marginal costs exceeded their benefits. this evidence failure -- and it is appropriate to call it a failure -- was inevitable, byec
. could your life in the air about to be changed? we have a special report. let's go out front. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. cold feet on gay marriage. could the supreme court be having second thoughts of taking up the lightning rod issue? today protesters and gay rights supporters swarming the steps of the supreme court and inside the justices were listening to the arguments. bullet point by bullet point. for and against. california's ban on same-sex marriage. that's the so-called proposition 8. the justices have the power to make gay marriage the law of the land. currently, it's actually only the law in nine states and washington, d.c. if you go straight from that to all 50, well, that's a really big edict from the high court and some justices sounded wary of issuing such a broad ruling. >> on a question like that, of such fundamental importance, why should it not be left for the people? either acting through initiatives and referendums or through their elected public officials? >> well, others like justice kennedy questioned why they were hearing the case in the first
. unpredictable, violent change occurs. that's the world we're in. the minute you read machiavellian you're in our world, the world of the unpredictable. the unforeseeable, the violent, the unforseen. and that seems to me a tremendously powerful and modern aspect of machiavellian. equally at the same time as the qaation shows men are not prisoners of fortune. the whole burden of chapter 25 is to say, yes, stuff happens. the unpredictable occurs. catastrophe occur, the around overflows, men are not prisoners of this. they need not be resigned to their fate. it's a very strong emphasis, i think, professor muir made the point about the tremendous point of will in machiavellian. will against fortune. will against fate, will against chance, will against contingency. these are strong and powerful themes in machiavellian. for tuna does not preach resignation. there's not a line of resignation in machiavellian's writing. politicians, in other words, were people in charge of public affairs in florence cannot predict the unpredictable. they can't be sure when the river is going to overflow. they can put up
the groundbreaking novel, published in 1958, had changed him. writinge process of "things fall apart, >> what it changed my life. because i had to invent the language of that story. something that anybody was teaching anywhere. the conversation between evo and english. make it up as i went along. >> chinua achebe died in boston after a brief illness. and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. of the financial world are on the small mediterranean island of cyprus today. the government of cyprus has brokered a last-ditch $13 billion bailout deal with european officials to stave off the collapse of its banking sector. under the deal, all bank deposits above approximately $130,000 will be frozen and used to help pay off the banking sector's debts. this will result in a specially heavy losses for foreign depositors at the mediterranean island's banks, many of which are russian. in addition, cyprus's second largest bank will be shut down. protesters have described the deal as an economic world war iii. some say cyprus
of that year which then changed the california constitution to eliminate that california supreme court decision. in the interim 18,000 same-sex couples got married in california. the first challenge was to whether or not proposition 8 was really a revision of the california constitution and had to go through the legislature, the california supreme court said, no, no, no, it's an amendment to the constitution, so challenge, a challenge to proposition 8 under the california constitutioning is not going to work pause -- constitution is not going to work because it's an amendment to the constitution. .. intervened in the case. now, at that point the attorney general mcgovern was still parties to the case. they were defendants in the case so that was a clear case or controversy. they were enforcing the law and the interveners, therefore, could piggyback on the standing of the actual parties. when the decision came down we had a 12 day trial, with evidence from all kinds of experts and plaintiffs and other individuals. the district judge found proposition eight unconstitutional on the grounds that we
. they change the name to chesty after left turn lewis chesty puller and they take it all very seriously. >> we have had them busted back in rank before. >> chris: how did the dogs take it? >> marines don't take it well when they get demoted. we can't have a mascot biting and barking and doing things and what they are not supposed to do. >> chris: that is what he did last summer when he went after panetta's dog? >> he barked. >> chris: there was challenging, control of the military? >> this was right in front of the secretary of defense. >> after the breach of protocol there was speculation that he was being forced out. >> he was promoted to sergeant after that. it's not a forced retirement. >> chris: whatever the reason the pup should be the new mascot by late august with as many as five public events a week. >> chesty is great way to represent the more than 200,000 sailors and semifinalians that make up our corps. he has very important job. we're happy to have him. >> chris: one of my favorite power players ever. the marine mascot generally says five years as chesty is five years which is 35
. >> well, all you have got do do is change administrations. unless you believe we are going to have democrats until the end of time. >> bill: i don't know. i'm worried. >> your theory is wrong. >> bill: i'm worried about these people, the voters now because the mentality is changing in this country. it's changing. and that worries me. charles, very interesting, as always. we appreciate it. happy passover to you. next on the run down. next on the run down, megyn kelly supreme court gay marriage arguments today. later glenn beck going to talk about the continuing attacks on christitititi >> bill: and in the impact segment tonight, the supreme court begins to hear the gay marriage argument. in france, the perhaps as many as 1 million people are demonstrating against gay marriage. the protest so intense police had to use tear gas. shep. >> bill: in washington, however, it's a different story. they were also protests both in favor and against gay marriage but the issue here not nearly as volatile as it is in france. in fact, the latest polling shows the majority of americans now favor ga
will enforce it until the court strikes it down. we heard from the 83-year-old poster child of change, edy windsor. . i am today an out lesbian it's kind of overwhelming for me. >> she married her long-term partner in 2007 but when thea died two years later she was saddled with a six figure bill for inheritance tax that would not have aplayed if married to man. on the steps of the court she thanks the judges. >> very respected and i speak for it to be good. >> so after two days of hearings, it's pretty clear the court is not just divided, as you would expect, but conflicted about how boldly and broadly to rule on this issue. the words of justice anthony kennedy, he and his colleagues are in unchartered waters and we'll know in a few weeks how far they're prepared to go. steve kingston, bbc news at the u.s. supreme court. >> for more on the cases heard the past two days, i spoke a breathe time ago with adam, a supreme court reporter for "the new york times." adam, i know reading the tea leaves of the supreme court is a very inexact science but based on what you heard today, do you think ed
lisa: this disease just ravages a family. it changes your life. if we work together, we can stop this epidemic. now is the moment. grace: contact brightfocus and learn more. sandra: lets go "off the dest" and to india where there is a growing trend, mass weddings to help those who are financially struggling. a wedding for 52 couples. gifts were donated to the newlyweds including pencils, mattresses, solar lights and fans. february housing starts, con expecting starts to rise by 2.8% following a sharp drop of 8.5% in january. david: the number one thing to be watching for is cypress. the vote expected to be tomorrow. anything could happen. we saw the breaking news earlier. the confiscation of deposits may be a precondition for the bailout. it'll be an exciting day tomorrow. sandra: thank you for having me. "money" with melissa francis is next. melissa: crisis in cypress as deposit features rock the market. will wall street be able to hang on to the rally? and should you still jump in, or maybe get out. chief investment strategist with charles schwab. plus it's a time to go for the
. that takes about 17 and a half years. i don't think a change of concern has changed fundamentals haven't changed. melissa: jonathan, jonathan, wait. >> what has happened in the last 12 years as gold has gone from being an asset which was doubted, not owned, to being widely owned and widely endorsed by the heard, if you will. if you want to look at the reality of what is happening in the market today, the dollar is strong, gold assets are weak. it is easy to say five, 10, 15 years down. melissa: on no very wealthy, very smart ceos who ask to have their bonuses paid in gold because they're so worried about the currency and the market, so worried about what is going on in our country. these are really smart, really wealthy people. speakers should have asked to being paid in the stock in their own company. all of this concern of the currency, money printing, etc., doesn't exist. melissa: thank you for coming on. tell me what you think, the mortgage tax deduction could be over. that would be bad news on the housing recovery. plus, a sleeping giant awakes, the grim days for natural gas price
-- >> that's pocket change. literally pocket change for warren buffett. >> what did he say, his perspective is always interesting. >> his demeanor -- >> even when it comes to newspapers. >> local is still important. >> if he still likes stocks and likes companies, shouldn't people at home like stocks and companies? he's a thoughtful man. i like him. >> let's talk about the markets overall as we start the week. the dow starting within 75 points of its all-time closing high. the markets are facing some headwinds. you have continued wrangling in washington over the sequester. data showing the wealthy shouldering the load in consumer spending. futures are lower after a sell-off in the shanghai market after beijing announced new property buying restrictions. you add all these things together, jim, and you think slowing growth around the world. we also, of course, got the terrible pmis on friday which showed slowing in europe, across europe. >> the best performing groups, augmented by the purchase of heinz, are these companies that do really well in a slow economy. kimberly, clorox, they're very
bet there are a lot of people who might return to the church if it changed. after tonight's celebrations are over, the question will be whether saint francis will be that change. "anderson cooper 360" starts right now. >> erin, thanks very much. good evening, everyone. good morning from rome. the world has a new pope, as you know do in and out know by now. 1.2 billion catholics have a new leader and unlike many they have ever had. a short time ago, stepped on to the balcony, begins day one of his papacy as a true pioneer in many ways. the first latin american pope, the first noneuropean pope in modern times. first to take the name francis after saint francis of assisi. this one made history quickly, as well. extraordinary scene in the square. the five rounds of voting, a decision. and as the white smoke rose, the crowd in st. peter's square erupted. the joy. this time, not tempered by mourning as it was eight years ago, because for the first time in 598 years, the previous pope is alive and well, retired, not deceased. as word got out, the crowd grew larger. people literal
in segregatio that 81% that andrew mentioned is not going to change its mind as it grows older. >> rose: we conclude with a conversation with the remarkable young filmmaker named adam leone. his new movie is called "gimme the loot." >> we really wanted to show a part of new york that isn't seen so much on movies and t.v. right now, i think. because a lot of people i know talk about how new york has become a mall and the big box stores. that's a part of new york but there's still this energy and there are these neighborhoods that are very much ale a very much still neighborhoods and so we wanted to go out into the bronx and all over the city and show that. >> rose: same-sex marriage and "gimme the loot" when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it is an important week for the united states supreme court. starting on tuesday, the court will hearing amounts in two cases involving the legality of same-sex marriage. the nine justices will first consider an appeal of an earlier ruling that rendered california's
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